North Korea Denies Involvement in Sony Hack

In more news about Sony this week that should make everyone say “Well, duh”, this Saturday the North Korean government issued a statement which categorically denied all involvement with the recent attack on the movie studio’s servers.

The country removed themselves from the conversation that their government had been behind the attack, and threatened “grave consequences” to any news organizations reporting that they had anything to do with it in the first place.

They continued by suggesting that the FBI and officials from the Hermit Kingdom should (shockingly) work together on finding the real hackers, and that they would not tolerate this “baseless slander” any longer than they absolutely had to.

“If the US refuses to accept our proposal for a joint investigation and continues to talk about some kind of response by dragging us into the case, it must remember there will be grave consequences.”

That said, there are some rumblings from those close to the situation that suggest the hack could have been an inside job, and that the hermit nation actually may have had nothing to do with it. They suggest that the specific nature of the information gathered and the hacker’s innate knowledge of Sony’s file structure suggests that the breach could have been the work of a disgruntled ex-employee.

Going from there, it wouldn’t be difficult to assume that North Korea simply bribed one of these former coders into flipping sides, and handing over the valuable administrative credentials that were said to have been used to launch the breach from the beginning.

After going through employment records of the past few months, members of the FBI team tasked with the investigation have already come up with a laundry list of possible culprits, including two members of the IT staff who were unceremoniously fired after the studio discovered they had been using the internal network to pirate copyrighted material through BitTorrent.

The Obama administration has said they’re sticking by their assertion that North Korea was responsible for Sony’s server woes, especially considering the fact that although the country is eager to jump into a joint probe with teams from the US, they also closed out their statement by referring to what the GoP did as a “righteous deed”.

“If the U.S. refuses to accept our proposal for a joint investigation and continues to talk about some kind of response by dragging us into the case, it must remember there will be grave consequences,” the spokesman said.

Sony, a Japanese-owned company, is said to have buckled to North Korea’s demands and stopped the showing of The Interview due to a series of intense negotiations both countries are currently locked in over the state of trade tariffs with neighboring China.

Luckily, the studio has also said they’re not squashing the film completely, and would be open to some sort of release schedule through digital distribution channels from Amazon, iTunes, or Netflix if any of the streaming services agreed to putting themselves on the line given the recent turn of events.